Meibomian Gland Dysfunction

If your eyes are dry and gritty and eyedrops just don’t seem to be helping, you may have an underlying issue in your eyelids causing your Dry Eye Disease.  Meibomian Gland Dysfunction, or MGD, is when the glands in your eyelids are obstructed or clogged and aren’t creating the necessary oils that keep your eyes healthy and protected. MGD is a leading cause of Dry Eye Disease and could be the cause of yours too. In fact, in one study, 86% of dry eye patients had MGD.¹

Why might the glands in your eyelids not be working?

MGD develops when your Meibomian glands become obstructed or plugged up. There are many reasons why this would happen, and many factors that can contribute or even exacerbate the effects of MGD, including but not limited to:

The good news is that we can help!  Come see us for a Dry Eye Disease and MGD consultation!

We can assess your dry eye condition, and with a simple evaluation, we can help determine if you have MGD. We offer a treatment for MGD with the LipiFlow® Pulsation System. The treatment, a combination of localized heat and gentle but directional pressure, has a restorative effect on your Meibomian gland function. It clears gland obstructions so that your glands can produce the essential oils needed for a healthy tear film and eye.

Call us today for a Consultation!  856-845-7968

 
REFERENCES: 1. Lemp MA, Crews LA, Bron AJ, Foulks GN, Sullivan BD. Distribution of aqueous-deficient and evaporative dry eye in a clinic-based patient cohort: a retrospective study. Cornea. 2012;31(5):472-478. 2. American Optometric Association, Paraoptometric Resource Center, CPC Submission, T Petrosyan. Cosmetics and the eye: how your beauty products could be harming your eyes. Found at: https://www.aoa.org/Documents/CPC%20SUBMISSION%20%20Cosmetics%20and%20the%20Eye%20How%20Your%20Beauty%20Products%20Could%20Be%20Harming%20Your%20Eyes.pdf, 2018. Accessed December 10, 2019. 3. Duke University website. Immune response likely culprit in eyelid gland condition that causes dry eye. Found at: https://dukeeyecenter.duke.edu/news-events/immune-response-likely-culprit-eyelid-gland-condition-causes-dry-eye, July 2018. Accessed December 10, 2019.
CAUTION: Federal law restricts this device to sale by or on the order of a licensed physician.
INDICATIONS AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION for LipiFlow® Thermal Pulsation System
INDICATIONS: The LipiFlow® Thermal Pulsation System is intended for the application of localized heat and pressure therapy in adult patients with chronic cystic conditions of the eyelids, including meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), also known as evaporative dry eye or lipid deficiency dry eye. CONTRAINDICATIONS: Do not use the LipiFlow® System in patients with the following conditions. Use of the device in patients with these conditions may cause injury. Safety and effectiveness of the device have not been studied in patients with these conditions. Ocular surgery within prior 3 months, including intraocular, oculo-plastic, corneal or refractive surgery procedure. Ocular injury within prior 3 months. Ocular herpes of eye or eyelid within prior 3 months. Active ocular infection (e.g., viral, bacterial, mycobacterial, protozoan, or fungal infection of the cornea, conjunctiva, lacrimal gland, lacrimal sac, or eyelids including a hordeolum or stye). Active ocular inflammation or history of chronic, recurrent ocular inflammation within prior 3 months (e.g., retinitis, macular inflammation, choroiditis, uveitis, iritis, scleritis, episcleritis, keratitis). Eyelid abnormalities that affect lid function (e.g., entropion, ectropion, tumor, edema, blepharospasm, lagophthalmos, severe trichiasis, severe ptosis). Ocular surface abnormality that may compromise corneal integrity (e.g., prior chemical burn, recurrent corneal erosion, corneal epithelial defect, Grade 3 corneal fluorescein staining, or map dot fingerprint dystrophy). PRECAUTIONS: The Activator or Activator II (Disposable) may not fit all eyes, such as eyes with small palpebral fornices. Use of the LipiFlow® System in patients with the following conditions may result in reduced treatment effectiveness because these conditions may cause ocular symptoms unrelated to cystic meibomian glands and require other medical management. Safety and effectiveness of the device have not been studied in patients with these conditions. Moderate to severe (Grade 2-4) allergic, vernal or giant papillary conjunctivitis. Severe (Grade 3 or 4) eyelid inflammation (e.g., blepharochalasis, staphylococcal blepharitis or seborrheic blepharitis). Patients with severe eyelid inflammation should be treated medically prior to device use. Systemic disease conditions that cause dry eye (e.g., Stevens-Johnson syndrome, vitamin A deficiency, rheumatoid arthritis, Wegener’s granulomatosis, sarcoidosis, leukemia, Riley-Day syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren’s syndrome). Taking medications known to cause dryness (e.g., isotretinoin (Accutane®) and systemic antihistamines). Esthetic eyelid and eyelash procedures (e.g., blepharoplasty, lash extensions, eyelid tattooing). In addition, the treatment procedure may loosen previously inserted punctal plugs, which may worsen the patient’s dry eye symptoms. ADVERSE EFFECTS: Potential adverse effects that may occur as a result of the procedure include, but are not limited to, the onset or increase in: Eyelid/eye pain requiring discontinuation of the treatment procedure; Eyelid irritation or inflammation (e.g., edema, bruising, blood blister, dermatitis, hordeolum or chalazion); Ocular surface irritation or inflammation (e.g., corneal abrasion, conjunctival edema or conjunctival injection (hyperemia)); and Ocular symptoms (e.g., burning, stinging, tearing, itching, discharge, redness, foreign body sensation, visual disturbance, sensitivity to light). Potential serious adverse events (defined as permanent impairment or damage to a body structure or function or necessitates medical or surgical intervention to preclude permanent impairment or damage to a body structure or function) that are not anticipated because of the device mitigations to prevent occurrence include: Thermal injury to the eyelid or eye, including conjunctiva, cornea or lens; Physical pressure-induced injury to the eyelid; and Ocular surface (corneal) infection. ATTENTION: Reference the LipiFlow® Thermal Pulsation System Instructions for Use for a complete listing of indications, warnings, and precautions.
 
Content courtesy of Johnson & Johnson Surgical Vision, Inc.

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