More Older Americans Will Suffer From Low Vision, Here’s How to Make Life Easier and Safer

Low Vision device

The number of older Americans with low vision is expected to double in the coming years, as more people live longer. Low vision describes poor vision that can't be fixed or improved with glasses, contacts or surgery. People with low vision have blind spots that can make it difficult or impossible to drive, read or see faces. But the tragedy isn’t that people have lost vision, it’s that most believe nothing can be done to improve their quality of life. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and Friedberg Eye Associates, PA are taking the opportunity of September’s Healthy Aging Month to let people know they can retain their independence and stay safe, despite declining vision.

Age-related macular degeneration is one of the leading causes of low vision. Other common contributors include diabetic eye disease, glaucoma and inherited retinal diseases. Whatever the cause, vision rehabilitation helps people make the most of the vision they have left so they can live as independently as possible.

The field of vision rehabilitation has advanced significantly over the years, offering more effective technologies and strategies. Today, ophthalmologists can offer solutions that range from a simple, portable video magnifier that can enlarge text and objects to high-tech glasses with cameras that allow people to read text and see faces.

But there are many simple changes people can make on their own to help them live better:

Most importantly, see an ophthalmologist and a low vision specialist. An ophthalmologist can determine the full extent of vision loss and exact location of blind spots. Either the ophthalmologist or a low vision specialist can then determine the best techniques and devices that can help patients get around their individual challenges.

Unfortunately, many patients are referred for vision rehabilitation as a last resort, once their disease has advanced to a late stage. But it's most effective when introduced early in a patient's visual loss, so they can involve themselves in the process as they learn how to move around in their new world.

“The prospect of being unable to drive, read or see loved one’s faces is frightening and can lead some people to withdraw from life,” said John D. Shepherd, M.D., a clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. “While there isn’t one strategy or tool that works for every person, vision rehabilitation offers hope. It can help people stay in their homes and keep doing the things they love to do.”

To learn more ways to keep your eyes healthy, visit the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® website.

Photo courtesy of National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health (NEI/NIH).

You Might Also Enjoy...

Nation’s Ophthalmologists Issue New Advice This July 4th

This July 4th we encourage the public to leave the fireworks to the professionals and go see a public display. Too many hospital related injuries have occurred throughout the country around this time of year due to fireworks. Be smart, be safe and enjoy!

Three Things Patients Should Know About Cataracts

Approximately 25 million Americans have cataracts, which causes cloudy, blurry or dim vision and often develops with advancing age. This June, Friedberg Eye Associates, PA joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in observing Cataract Awareness Month...

Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

What is Conjunctivitis? Signs and symptoms may occur in one or both eyes. The most common causes of conjunctivitis are infections (viral or bacterial), allergies or irritation from something in the environment.

5 Steps to Lower Your Risk of Eye Disease

By age 65, one in three Americans will have a vision-impairing eye disease. Many sight-robbing conditions can be effectively treated if detected early enough, in many cases limiting or eliminating the damage to eyesight.