Nation’s Ophthalmologists Issue New Advice This July 4th

Child playing with sparkler

Every Fourth of July, families, friends, and communities come together throughout the country to view firework displays. And every year, we encourage the public to leave the fireworks to the professionals and go to a public display. At the same time, fireworks sales have spiked as much as 400 percent during the last year, according to news reports. Friedberg Eye Associates, PA and the American Academy of Ophthalmology are concerned that trips to the hospital for fireworks-related injuries will mirror this spike in fireworks sales.

We remind the public that consumer fireworks are dangerous both to those who set them off and to bystanders. Here are the facts:

There is significant variability among state and county laws regarding the use of consumer fireworks. Setting off fireworks at home is illegal in some states. For people in states in which it’s legal, here’s how to make sure your backyard celebration doesn’t end in the ER:

If you suffer an eye injury from a firework:

This July 4th we encourage the public to leave the fireworks to the professionals and go see a public display.  Too many hospital related injuries have occurred throughout the country around this time of year due to fireworks. Be smart, be safe and enjoy!

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