Workplace Eye Wellness Month

computer work

In support of Workplace Eye Wellness Month in March, Friedberg Eye Associates PA and the American Academy of Ophthalmology are offering tips to desk workers everywhere whose eyes may need relief from too much screen time.

Many people who spend long hours reading or working on a computer for their jobs experience eye discomfort. Focusing on tiny type for hours on end can cause eye strain, fatigue and headaches. Staring at screens for long periods can also leave eyes parched, red and gritty-feeling.

One reason dry eye affects computer users in particular may have to do with blinking. Every time the eyelid closes, it washes moisture over the front of the eye. Normally, people blink about 14 times a minute or so. Focusing the eyes on computer screens or other digital displays has been shown to reduce a person’s blink rate by a third to a half, drying out eyes as a result.

To help avoid workplace dry eye and eye strain, follow these eye ergonomics tips from the American Academy of Ophthalmology:

Those experiencing consistently dry red eyes or eye pain should have an eye exam to evaluate their symptoms.

For more information on computers and eye strain, see the American Academy of Ophthalmology's public information website at www.aao.org/eye-health.

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